Scentual Submissions

The Heretical Herald Volume 1 Issue 1 February 11, AS XXXVIII being 2004 AD

Ihave discovered that I am a person who loves to find mail in their mailbox. For me it is like a small birthday or Christmas every time, but I’ve found of late I don’t get much other than bills and junk mail and not even interesting junk mail like catalogues from gift companies. I have heard that the Herald in charge of Submissions gets many surprises in their mailbox through the function of their office. Some of these surprises are not those of seeing the interesting and creative heraldic submissions though. I have heard tale of one “surprise” a recent An Tir Lions Blood Herald found waiting in ambush.

Now I cannot do the full justice the Herald in question could, but they discovered an interesting “smell” coming from their mail. Upon going through it they discovered one particular submission package scent to them. The combination of odours to it was overwhelming, a combination of many smells. The submitter most apparently to all but the nose deaf had used scented markers to colour in the coloured copies of their device submission. If I recall correctly said Lions Blood tacked the submission to the inside roof of their porch for over a week to somewhat reduce the reek. I do not recall the actual combination of smells, but indeed I hear it was overwhelming even if individually the scents were pleasurable.

The choice of media to use for colouring in the shield on your submission form is very important. It has to be remembered that your submission form is not a “trial run”. It is the copy that will be brought to the people who decide if your submission will pass or not. If it does pass the actual submission forms will be put on file for reference in future. This is important to realise for not all inks and pencils and paints are created equal. Some are more colourfast than others. Some have even greater problems. (It also means that you should take some care with your artwork, but that is the meat for a future article.)

Things that are important to keep in mind are that whatever you use must have a rich bold colour that will not be mistaken for any other colour and definitely is the heraldic colour in question. Of course this is as much choice of hue and tint as medium used. The blue you choose should be a good middle of the road blue. Not a dark navy blue, nor a light pastel one. It is also important that the blue not be edging toward green or purple. It should be bold, but not fluorescent. There can be some latitude of course. It should also cover well. The green should follow similar criteria, as should the red. It is important that the purple not be too red or too blue. Perhaps a harder colour to judge than the others.

You should not be tempted to use the metallic options for argent and Or on your submissions forms. While it might look spiffy when done, most if not all the metallic inks change substantially over time to things very different. Some might in short order be left looking grey, black, brown, or even pink! For argent use white and not grey. For Or use yellow and not orange. Using grey or orange can result in your submission being returned to you, which would substantially delay your submission. Of course for charges that blazoned “proper” are actually grey or orange or brown, you may use that appropriate colour.

English: Back side of cheap uncoated wide-form...

English: Back side of
cheap uncoated wide-format plotter paper heavily soaked with inkjet
printer ink. The swelled cellulose fibers revert back to their
pre-pressed state, showing the papermaking mesh belt pattern on which
the wet fibers collected prior to pressing and sizing. (Photo credit:
Wikipedia)

In this day and age of the computer and a colour printer in so very many households you might think a colour printer a good device to print out your device with. Unfortunately the colour inks used in inkjet colour printers are

not very colourfast, even ones considered “archival” in quality. The colours can and do change in what can seem to be a remarkably short time. What might start out as black might end up pink; a red, orange; purple, red; and who knows what. In part that is just because the ink is unstable. Inkjet ink is also water-soluble and even high humidity can affect it causing it to run. This might not only effect your own submission but others that are adjacent to it in a filing cabinet.

TW a hint, if you wish to take advantage of your inkjet printer to print out the black and white forms it is advisable to print them out and then bring them to a copier shop and photocopy them. Then use the photocopies which won’t be using water soluble ink.

Remember that submissions do not travel in climate controlled courier pouches carried by diplomats, they are subject to the vagaries of the postal service and unheated trucks and aeroplane holds. This can cause things like condensation to form in unexpected ways and great changes in temperature shifts during transit. Your submission from the time you mail it off in perhaps winter might pass through -40 F weather and before it has even gotten to Laurel have sat in a filing cabinet at +100 F! That’s a huge temperature difference!

As well as the colour stability there are mechanical type issues. Some materials simply will do things like flake off. Some paints might seem perfect otherwise but would end up cracking and ending up eventually in small piles of flakes at the bottom of some file folder. Others don’t cover well like pencil crayon and just don’t give good dense coverage.

Everyday Stain and Odor Remover

Everyday Stain and Odor Remover (Photo credit: artizone)

rayon has lead to some horror stories likened to the scented markers. Consider a stack of mail on a hot summer day. In that stack are a number of submissions and in one the device has been nicely coloured in wax crayons. In the torrid weather the wax, like any good well behaved wax does what wax does in heat. It melts, and melted wax does what it has done even in period, it wicks. I wicks right through the porous paper soaking it through. Of course the wax doesn’t know the difference between one envelope and another and it happily wicks its way through other submissions it has been stacked. When cooled there is one solid waxy chunk where once there were a number of nice heraldic submissions. It has happened. I’d imagine more than just the once. In the one case I heard of the person who used the crayon was horrified to hear of what happened and very apologetic. I also heard that the combination wax and paper really burnt well in a fire at a later date.

The best thing to do is to talk to the Heralds about it and the best Herald to talk with is the submissions Herald and in An Tir that is the Lions Blood Herald. I have gathered that what is best in the end are marking pens and the best out of them are the basic “Crayola” ones. There are probably others as good, but Crayola are ones you are most likely to be able to find by name. But don’t use the Crayola fluorescent ones or other Crayola specialty ones like Crayola the scented markers!

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One thought on “Scentual Submissions

  1. Pingback: Hark the Heretical Herald V1:2 | The Heretical Herald

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